Callaloo Literary Journal Submissions Essays

 


CALLALOO: A JOURNAL OF AFRICAN DIASPORA ARTS & LETTERS

Editor & Founder: Charles H. Rowell
Founded: 1976
Publication Frequency: Quarterly
Circulation: c. 2500
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Subscription & Advertising Info: http://www.press.jhu.edu/press/journals/cal
Journal Type: literary and academic

Works Published: 
Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Interviews, Book Reviews, Literary & Cultural Criticism, Visual Art

Brief Description: 
Callaloo is a journal devoted to creative work by and critical studies of the work of African-Americans and peoples of African descent throughout the African Diaspora. Established as well as emerging writers find a home in Callaloo. In addition to its general issues, Callaloo frequently publishes special issues such as the recent special issue on literature from the Dominican Republic and by Dominican-Americans, the 2-part Emerging Male Writers special issue, and author-focused issues such as the Sterling Brown special issue. Special issues on Haiti and on Puerto Rican Women Writers have received awards from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals and the Association of American Publishers Professional Scholarly Publishing Division. Writers published in Callaloo include: Ernest Gaines, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Octavia Butler, Alice Walker, Lucille Clifton, Edwidge Danticat, Thomas Glave, Samuel Delany, and John Edgar Wideman. Callaloo sponsors a number of special events and public readings--such as the annual October reading at the Public Theater of New York--and hosts its own Creative Writing Workshop for young writers.

Brief History: 
Callaloo was originally founded as a Black South Forum by Charles H. Rowell in 1976 while he was at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. In 1977, the journal moved with the editor to the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY where it eventually broadened its focus to become a journal of African-American literature. With its move to the University of Virginia in 1986, the journal again broadened its scope to envelope the entire African Diaspora; this focus has been retained to the present day, even as it moved in 2001 to Texas A&M University. Through its history, Callaloo has become more than a literary journal, growing into a de facto literary and cultural center, organizing and coordinating a variety of activities that serve to exhibit, critique, and promote black literary culture in the United States and abroad.

Editor: Charles H. Rowell 
Managing Editor: Ginger Thornton 
Editorial Assistant: Terrilynn D. Platt Associate 
Editors: 
Myriam J.A. Chancy, 
Carrol F. Coates, 
Brent Hayes Edwards, 
Percival Everett, 
Helen Elaine Lee, 
Carl Phillips, 
Marlon B. Ross 

Book Review Editors: 
Kathleen M. Balutansky, 
Tina Campt, 
Reetika Vazirani, 
Michelle M. Wright 

Contributing & Advisory Editors: 
Elizabeth Alexander 
Kimberly Benston 
Finnie Coleman 
Maryse Cond� 
Thadious Davis 
Toi Derricotte 
Rita Dove 
Thomas Sayers Ellis 
Ernest Gaines 
Farah Jasmine Griffin 
Kendra Hamilton 
Saidiya Hartman 
Mae G. Henderson 
Yusef Komunyakaa 
E. Ethelbert Miller 
Bruce Morrow 
Gustavo Pell�n 
Carla Peterson 
Richard Powell 
Rhonda Cobham-Sander 
Nathan A. Scott, Jr. 
Robert B. Stepto 
Sharan Strang, 
Silvio Torres-Saillant 
Derek Walcott 
Steven F. White 
John Edgar Wideman 
Judith Wilson 
Jay Wright 
Kevin Young

 

Praise for Callaloo: 
�Callaloo has been an indispensable force in my life ever since its editor, Charles Rowell, published my first book of fiction in 1985. The embracing vision of Callaloo has encouraged me to stretch my literary muscles, so that I have continued to explore other genres besides poetry in the quest to plumb the ever unfolding complexities of the human soul.� 
�Rita Dove, former Poet Laureate of the USA, University of Virginia 

�Callaloo has always been one of the finest literary journals available. The quality of the selected work is obvious. In this time of need for peace, healing and intercultural understanding Callaloo is clearly even more important to our spirit; essential.� 
�Lucille Clifton, St. Mary's College 

�Callaloo has emerged as our most important forum for fiction, criticism, and poetry by Afro-American writers. From one issue to the next, it is a resource scholars and creators will find crucial for understanding contemporary black literary practice.� 
�Charles Johnson, University of Washington

 �Without Callaloo, black writers would still be struggling with that extra burden (in addition to the formidable task of creating art in this culture) of repeating the partyline account of the African-American experience, an experience that is as varied as any other American experience but which has been funneled into a tiny vessel of clich's and set pieces.� 
�Percival Everett, University of Southern California 

�Since its beginning, Callaloo has towered not only as the pre-eminent journal of African diasporic arts and letters, but also as the consistent nurturer of younger, previously unknown, and emerging writers of the highest quality from every diasporic quarter. Callaloo continues to situate and amplify the arts, literatures, and cultures of the Hispanophone, Anglophone, and Francophone Caribbean in compelling intersections, illuminating conversations between tradition and slicing edge, history and corners unknown. And witness the emergence of queer letters in these pages: all of sterling imagination, propelling our traditions into brilliancies far beyond the easy, the simple, the not-brave.� 
�Thomas Glave, State University of New York, Binghamton

Contact Info: 

Callaloo 
Department of English 
Texas A&M University 
4227 TAMU 
College Station, TX 77843-4227

979-458-3108 fax: 979-458-3275 callaloo@tamu.eduhttp://callaloo.tamu.edu

Callaloo Online: 
Callaloo Homepage (currently under construction): 
http://callaloo.tamu.edu 

Johns Hopkins University Press Callaloo Info Page: 
http://www.press.jhu.edu/press/journals/cal 

Callaloo Cover Art Gallery: 
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~ug01/westkaemper/callaloo/callaloo.html 

Callaloo v.1-17 full text archive at JSTOR (subscription only): 
http://www.jstor.org 

Callaloo v.18-present full text archive at Project Muse (subscription only):http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/cal

 

CALLALOO SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Callaloo is a journal devoted to creative work by and critical studies of the work of African-Americans and peoples of African descent throughout the African Diaspora. Visual art and studies of life and culture in the Black world are also published regularly in Callaloo, as is wide-ranging academic and cultural criticism. Callaloo is published quarterly (Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall), and accepts original submissions of essays, interviews, short fiction, poetry, drama, book reviews, and visual art. We do not accept any unsolicited material that has been previously published.

  1. All submitted material must include either an e-mail address or a self-addressed envelope (SAE) with loose postage adequate for a letter notifying you of our decision. (Optional: If you would like returned to you any manuscripts not sent to our readers, include enough additional postage with the SAE to do so. We will return excess loose postage.) 
  2. All manuscripts must be submitted in triplicate, and must NOT bear the author's name or any other identifying information about the author. This enables our readers to review manuscripts blindly. We cannot begin the review process until we have received all three copies. 
  3. Please include a cover letter listing the titles of the submitted works, and detailing all relevant contact information for the author, including an e-mail address if available. 
  4. Each individual copy of essays, short stories, multiple-page poems, or other longer prose manuscripts should be stapled. 
  5. The maximum word limit for any one manuscript is 10,000 (approx. 25 single-spaced pages, 12 pt. font). 
  6. Please do not submit more than ten poems in a single submission, and be certain to place no more than one poem on each page. 
  7. Artwork should be submitted as prints or slides. Artwork need not be submitted in triplicate. Photos should be submitted as 4 x 7 or larger prints (nearly all photos appear in the journal in black and white). 
  8. Bibliographies and documented material should follow the MLA Style Manual (most recent edition). 
  9. We currently do not accept submissions via e-mail or fax transmission. (Exceptions are occasionally made for persons submitting from overseas. Call or e-mail to inquire if this is applicable to you.) 
  10. Please do not send revisions during the time your manuscript is being reviewed; these cannot be considered. The editors do not assume responsibility for loss or damage to materials submitted. Nor do the editors, staff, or financial supporters assume any legal responsibility for materials published in the journal. Materials published in the journal do not necessarily represent the views of the editors, staff, and financial supporters.

Please send submissions to the following address: 

Callaloo Submissions 
Department of English Texas A&M University 
4227 TAMU 
College Station, TX 77843-4227

Please direct queries by surface mail to the above address, by e-mail to callaloo@tamu.edu, or by phone to 979-458-3108.

 

*IMPORTANT NOTICE* 

CALLALOO has switched to an online manuscript tracking system. Please submit all manuscripts online here.

Guidelines for Contributors

Thank you for your interest in Callaloo and for the opportunity to review your work.

As you no doubt already know, Callaloo is a journal devoted to creative work by and critical studies of the work of African Americans and peoples of African descent throughout the African Diaspora. Visual art and studies of life and culture in the Black world are also published regularly in Callaloo, as is wide-ranging cultural criticism. Callaloo is published five times a year (Winter, Spring, Summer, Art, and Fall), and accepts original submissions of scholarly articles, book reviews, interviews, nonfiction essays, short fiction, poetry, and visual art. 

 All manuscripts must be double spaced and submitted only as a Word document (.doc or .docx). Identifying information, including names of authors, addresses, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses, should not be included in the manuscript.  Manuscripts should not exceed 10,000 words excluding the title page, abstract, biographical information, and references. All manuscripts should follow the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd edition) and include a works cited and endnotes, not footnotes. Callaloo's Style Guidelines can be downloaded here.

  • IMPORTANT NOTE: All submissions made to the journal are considered final drafts.In order to honor our publisher's production schedule, manuscripts accepted for publication in Callaloo must be forwarded to our Production Editor immediately, allowing contributors no time to make revisions. Before submitting your work, please be sure that the manuscript being uploaded is the version you wish to ultimately see in print.
  • All poetry submissions are now limited to no more than five poems at a time with a maximum of ten poems by an author per calendar year.  Additional poems (unless requested by the Editor) will automatically be declined and returned. You must create a separate submission for each poem.
  • All fiction submissions are now limited to one manuscript per submission with a maximum of three submissions by an author each calendar year.  Additional fiction submissions (unless requested by the Editor) will automatically be declined and returned. You must create a separate submission for each fiction manuscript.
  • Artwork should be submitted as low-resolution .jpg or PDF files. Artwork must include the following information: title of piece, year created, media, dimensions (in inches), location of the piece. 
  • Manuscripts submitted to Callaloo should not be currently under review by another journal or by a book-length publication.  We do not accept simultaneous submissions. Moreover, we do not accept any unsolicited material that has been previously published. 
  • Please do not send revisions during the time your manuscript is being reviewed; those revisions will not be considered during the review process.
  • Throughout the calendar year, authors who have submitted manuscripts to Callaloo may track the status of their submissions at any time.
  • Authors will be contacted after the review process, which takes from two months to one year, on average.

 
To submit, please click here.

 

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *