Extra Credit Book Report Assignment 5th


i teach 6th, and this is my extra credit policy:

i will not give you extra credit immediately after a progress report and you see that your grade it bad

i will not give you extra credit immediately before report cards when you worry that your grade will be bad

i will not offer you extra credit because your parents ask me for it

i WILL...give a bonus spelling word each week; try to include challenging extra credit questions on quizzes and tests; offer at least 1 extra credit opportunity (above and beyond, extension, do at home, on your own time, takes some attention, energy, and time!) for each subject at least once a quarter. (i also have a couple year-long extra credit opportunities: language--find a printed grammar/mechanics error and bring it in and tell me how it needs to be fixed; social studies--check the nation section of the newspaper to find stories about Western Hemisphere countries (besides US), bring them in, and summarize them)

if you want a good grade in my class, you should...
pay attention during lessons
stay organized
actively study
do extra credit when offerred, even if it's not needed for a good grade
turn quality work in on time (i take 25% off for 1 day late, after that=0)
redo any assignment (not quiz or test) for an averaged grade
need help? come to study hall before or after school or ask for help during a recess

i go over these policies with my students at the beginning of the year---AND WITH PARENTS; they know not to ask for extra credit.

i offerred extra credit in language, social studies, and reading 2 weeks ago--everyone got a copy; everyone's parents got a reminder in monday folders...how many bothered to do it? 2 kids did reading; 2 other kids did social studies. (many more should have!) oh well, at least i can say i offerred it!

BTW--i don't tell students how much extra credit is worth-- i leave it open-ended, that way if a student does some real spectacular work, i can give more points. the point value is never anywhere near an entire assignment's grade--but it can soften the blow of a C or D grade!

 

It isn’t that Abby Carson can’t do her schoolwork. She just doesn’t like doing it. And in February a warning letter arrives at her home. Abby will have to repeat sixth grade—unless she meets some specific conditions, including taking on an extra-credit project to find a pen pal in a distant country. Seems simple enough. But when Abby’s first letter arrives at a small schooIt isn’t that Abby Carson can’t do her schoolwork. She just doesn’t like doing it. And in February a warning letter arrives at her home. Abby will have to repeat sixth grade—unless she meets some specific conditions, including taking on an extra-credit project to find a pen pal in a distant country. Seems simple enough. But when Abby’s first letter arrives at a small school in Afghanistan, the village elders agree that any letters going back to America must be written well. In English. And the only qualified student is a boy, Sadeed Bayat. Except in this village, it is not proper for a boy to correspond with a girl. So Sadeed’s younger sister will write the letters. Except she knows hardly any English. So Sadeed must write the letters. For his sister to sign. But what about the villagers who believe that girls should not be anywhere near a school? And what about those who believe that any contact with Americans is . . . unhealthy? Not so simple. But as letters flow back and forth—between the prairies of Illinois and the mountains of central Asia, across cultural and religious divides, through the minefields of different lifestyles and traditions—a small group of children begin to speak and listen to one another. And in just a few short weeks, they make important discoveries about their communities, about their world, and most of all, about themselves....more

Hardcover, 183 pages

Published June 23rd 2009 by Atheneum Books for Young Readers (first published June 1st 2009)

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *